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Faculty Member

 

Professor Luke Theogarajan

 

 

Luke Theogarajan is currently an Associate Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara in Electrical and Computer Engineering. He received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007. His research interests include combining the processing power of electronics with the versatility of synthetic chemistry to develop neural prosthetic devices, integrating CMOS circuits with nanoscale sensors to develop novel biosensors and developing simple synthetic mimics of biological function to gain a deeper physical understanding of biological phenomena. Before starting his Ph.D, he worked for intel for 5 years where he was part of the Pentium 4 design team. He has published both in the field of electrical engineering and polymer chemistry and holds 4 patents. Professor Theogarajan is also a 2010 NIH New Innovator Award recipient and a 2011 NSF Career Award recipient. He has been awarded the Northrupp Grumman Excellence in teaching award in 2011 and the outstanding faculty member in EE for the years 2009, 2010, and 2011.


Post-Doctoral Researchers

Dr. Weibin Cui

Weibin Cui has a PhD in Chemistry. He joined the group in Winter 2013.

Dr. Matthew Pevarnik

Matthew Pevarnik received his PhD in Physics from UC Irvine. He joined the group in Winter 2013.


Graduate Students

 

Samuel Beach

Samuel Beach graduated from the University of California Santa Barbara with a Bachelors of Science in Electrical Engineering in 2007. He is currently pursuing a Masters and PhD program in Electrical and Computer Engineering at UCSB. Samuel has a passion for microfabrication and since beginning his graduate education, has enjoyed assisting the Electrical and Computer Engineering department's microfabrication course sequences including ECE 141b, ECE124b, ECE124c, and ECE 220C. Sam joined the Biomimetic Circuits and Nanosystems Group in 2008 nearing the completion of his Master's coursework. He is currently working on several research projects involving microfabrication. His primary focus is to develop structures and fabrication techniques to facilitate the development of high-density neural implants (HDNI), which are a major thrust of the research group.

Aaron Bluestone

Aaron Bluestone received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from UC Santa Barbara in 2012. He is currently pursuing a Masters and PhD program in Electrical and Computer Engineering under the supervision of Professor Luke Theogarajan. His research focuses on high frequency opto-electronic oscillators for heterogenous integration of electronic and photonic systems.

 

Chin-hsuan Chen

Chin-hsuan (Jennifer) Chen received her B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering form National Tsing Hua University (NTHU), Taiwan, in 2007. She joined the Biomimetic Circuits and Nanosystems Group at the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2008 where she is currently pursuing her MS-PhD degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering under the supervision of Prof. Luke Theogarajan. Her current research interests include the design and co-integration of a nanopore detector with CMOS electronics for DNA sensing and measurements.

Sarah Grundeen

Sarah Grundeen received her B.S. degree in Bioengineering from UCLA in 2012. She joined the Biomimetic Circuits and Nanosystems Group in Fall 2012.


Danielle Guerra

Danielle grew up in Newport, NC, and served 6 years in the USAF after high school where she worked on the maintenance and repair of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs). Following her military service, she pursued her degree in Electrical Engineering at UCSB, where she worked for Professor Theogarajan as an undergraduate researcher on long-term, wireless glucose and heart rate monitors. She continued work as a graduate student for Professor Theogarajan in high frequency optical receivers for the heterogeneous integration of electronic and photonic systems. She is co-advised by Professor John Bowers. She also continues Professor Theogarajan's work on low-power retinal stimulation using analog and digital VLSI.

Melika Payvand

Melika received her B.S in Electrical Engineering from University of Tehran, Iran in 2010. She joined Biomimetic Circuits and Nanosystems Group in Fall 2011 and is currently pursuing a Masters and PhD program in Electrical Engineering at UCSB under the supervision of Prof. Luke Theogarajan.

Justin Rofeh

Justin received his B.S. in physics from UCSD in 2008. He is currently pursuing a PhD in physics at UCSB under the supervision of Prof. Luke Theogarajan.

Avantika Sodhi

Avantika received her B. Tech in Instrumentation and Control from Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Delhi, India, in 2009. She joined the Biomimetic Circuits and Nanosystems Group at the University of California, Santa Barbara in fall of 2010 and is currently pursuing a Masters and PhD program in Electrical Engineering, with emphasis on Electronics and Photonics, at UCSB under the supervision of Prof. Luke Theogarajan. Her Current research interests include Opto-Electronic integration for the design of ultra-fast low-power optical packet switching.


 

Sukru Yemenicioglu

Sukru Yemenicioglu achieved his bachelor's and master's in electrical engineering in University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. During his undergraduate study, he joined Prof Gregory Timp's group, where he worked on analysis of DNA translocation events through synthetic nanopores. He also developed a lumped element circuit model for nanopores on MOS and SiN membranes. During his master's, he continued his research in Prof. Rashid Bashir's research group, investigating bandwidth and stability of alternative synthetic membranes for nanopore research. Currently, his research in Biomimetic Circuits and Systems Group involves integration of CMOS circuitry with various biosensors and exploring graphene membranes for greater functionality. When he is not in the lab, he likes swimming, scuba diving, basketball, watching movies, going to concerts


Undergraduate Students

Justin Balter

Justin Balter is an undergraduate student majoring in bioengineering. He joined the lab as a freshman in 2012, currently working with Matthew Pevarnik studying synthetic nanopores.

Wyatt Rodgers

Wyatt Rodgers is an undergraduate pursuing a bachelors in mechanical engineering. He joined the lab in the fall of 2012 as a research assistant to Sukru Yemenicioglu. Wyatt preforms biomolecule translocation experiments using solid-state nanopore technology. Wyatt also provides signal processing and designs algorithms in MATLab for automated data analysis of bio-molecule translocation events.


Alumni




Kathryn Barron

Kathryn joined the Biomimetic Circuits and Nanosystems Group group in the summer of 2010 while still in high school to work on the synthesis and characterization of self-assembling nanoparticles for applications in site-specific drug delivery. She works under the guidance of Professor Theogarajan and doctoral candidate Michael Isaacman. Along with her fascination for conducting experiments in biochemistry, she enjoys hiking far and wide in search of the best swimming hole, painting bioluminescent protozoa and other strange phenomena, beachcombing for marine creatures and sea glass, reading - anything and everything, but particularly science essays, playing tennis, cycling, and traveling wherever and whenever she can. She will be a freshman at Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania in August, 2012.

Krisna Bhargava

Krisna Bhargava is a fourth year student in the Electrical Engineering department. Currently, his research is directed towards the development of nanomaterials with novel optical properties in the near infra-red spectrum with applications to wireless power-coupling and microscopy. He is also working in collaboration with Dr. Michael Liebling to develop a microfluidic imaging tool for both in vivio and in vitro biomedical experimentation.


Dr. Naraso Borjigin

Naraso received his PhD degree in organic chemistry in 2006 from Tokyo Institute of Technology in Japan. He joined Prof. Wudl's research group at UCSB as a postdoctoral researcher on September 2006. His research direction in Wudl group was low band-gap polymer for solar cell application. He has stared his second postdoc at Prof. Theogarajan group from March 2009. His research interest is new polymeric constructs for self-assembly and novel supramolecular assemblies. Naraso graduated in fall 2010.


Justin Chang

Justin S. Chang is a fourth year undergraduate student in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department. His current research consists of exploring the effect of inductive flux coupling caused by magnetic nano-particles. He is also an undergraduate assistant of the biomemtic fabrication team, which helps the team fabricate and develop new structures in photo resist. Justin graduated in Summer 2009.


 

Dr. Luis Chen

Luis Chen received his B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering in 2006 and 2007 at the University of California, Santa Barbara with emphasis in RF Communication Electronics and Integrated Circuits. Currently, he is currently pursuing his PhD at UCSB, under the supervision of Prof. Luke Theogarajan. His areas of interests are Low-power/high-speed analog and mixed signal integrated circuits, with applications to RF/Optical communication and sensors. Luis has received numerous awards, including the IEC William L. Everitt Award of Excellence, Best Teaching Assistant, and UCSB Institute for Energy Efficiency Holbrook Foundation Fellowship. In the summers of 2009, and 2010, he interned at GE Energy in Goleta, CA and GE Global Research’s RF and Photonics Lab in Niskayuna, NY respectively. At GE Energy, he worked on CO2, humidity and temperature sensors for demand-controlled smart building HVAC systems, saving buildings’ energy consumption by eliminating wasteful heating and cooling. At GE Research, he worked on next-generation RF sensors for diesel engines to reduce harmful particulate emissions. Dr. Luis Chen graduated Spring 2013.

Dr. Ellie Corigliano

Ellie Corigliano received her PhD from UCSB in Biochemistry. She joined the group in Fall 2010.


Dr. Mohamed Elzeftawi

Mohamed Elzeftawi received his B.S. degree with honors in Electronics and Communication Engineering in 2004 and his M.S. in Engineering Physics in 2007, both from Cairo University, Egypt. He is currently pursuing his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara under supervision of Professor Luke Theogarajan and Professor Patrick Yue. His research interests are low-power/low-noise/small-area amplifier and IR-UWB design for wirelessly powered high-density neural implants (HDNI) to record brain activity. Dr. Mohamed Elzeftawi graduated Spring 2012.

Laurel Hopkins

Laurel Hopkins is a fourth year Electrical Engineering undergraduate student. She graduated in Spring 2012.


Bassel Ihsan

Bassel Ihsan is a fourth year Electrical Engineering undergraduate student. Under the supervision of Luke Theogarajan and the guidance of Michael Isaacman, Bassel is synthesizing supramolecular neural prosthetics. He enjoys soccer, the ocean, and traveling. She graduated in Spring 2012.

Dr. Michael Isaacman

Michael grew up in New York, graduating from SUNY Albany with a B.S. in Biology. He currently is a Ph.D. candidate in the Theogarajan group, and his research focuses on the synthesis and self-assembling dynamics of silicone-based amphiphilic block copolymers. These polymers are being developed for various biolomedical applications, namely targeted delivery of therapeutics and as a scaffold for a neural prosthesis. Michael has published in the fields of natural product synthesis, chiroptical metal detection, and polymer chemistry. He enjoys going to the beach, running, and spending time with friends and family. Dr. Michael Isaacman graduated Spring 2013.

Taishi Kato

Taishi Kato is a fourth year Electrical Engineering undergraduate student. She graduated in Spring 2012.

 

 

Antonio Labaro

Antonio Labaro is a fourth year Electrical Engineering undergraduate student. His research involves developing an electronic system to deliver chemical stimuli to a mammalian retina and recording its neurophysiological responses. Antonio graduated in Spring 2009.

Star Li

Star Li is an M.S. student in Electrical Engineering. He graduated Spring 2012.

Dr. Kaveh Milaninia

Kaveh Milaninia received his PhD degree in materials science and engineering in 2009 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include nanostructures and systems for applications in electrical and bioengineering.


Dr. Saeed Mirzaeian

Saeed Mirzaeian received his B.S. and Masters degree in Computer Engineering in 2002 and 2004, from Sharif University of Technology, Iran. He received another Masters degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of California, Santa Barbara, under supervision of Prof. Tim Cheng in VLSI CAD design. He is currently pursuing his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara under supervision of Professor Luke Theogarajan. Dr. Saeed Mirzaein graduated in fall 2010.


Niloufar Pourian

Niloufar Pourian is a fourth year undergraduate student in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. Currently she is working with prof. Theogarajan. Her research involves creating a long-term continuous glucose monitoring system by implanting a glucose sensor along with an electronic instrument in the human body to measure the glucose level continuously. This research aims to create a non-enzymatic glucose detection device using nanoporous surfaces. Niloufar graduated in summer 2010.


 

Dr. Ashfaque Uddin

Ashfaque (aka Ash) is a graduate student in Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is working on the fabrication and co-integration of a DNA nanopore detector with CMOS electronics. In spare time, Ash likes to do photography, hang out at the beach, or go for fishing. Dr. Ashfaque Uddin graduated in Spring 2012.

Personal Website: www.uweb.ucsb.edu/~uddin/


 

Dr. Le Wang

Le Wang received his master degree in electrical engineering in 2006 from Washington State University. During his master program, he worked on radio frequency IC design and successfully taped out several chips such as 5GHz VCO, 15GHz phase shifter, and T/R switch. In 2008, he joined Prof. Theogarajan's research group at UCSB to pursue PhD degree and his research will be focusing on ultra low power analog IC design for medical applications. Currently, he is working on multi-channel Sigma Delta analog-to-digital converter in CMOS process to sample the neural signal. Before that, he received his BS in electrical engineering from Nanjing University, China. Dr. Le Wang graduated in Summer 2010.